CERN

Large Hadron Coliider celebrates 5 years of not destroying the world!!

LHC Atlas

LHC Atlas

Five years ago, at breakfast time, the world waited anxiously for news from CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The first nervy bunch of protons were due to be fired around the European lab’s latest and biggest particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), as it kicked into action.

Some “mercifully deluded people” – as Jeremy Paxman put it – feared the LHC would do no end of mischief. There was talk of planet-swallowing black holes, the transformation of the Earth into a new state of “strange” matter, and even the prospect of the obliteration of the entire universe. But for those of more sensible dispositions, the LHC’s first beam was an occasion for great excitement.

As the protons sped all the way round the 27km tunnel under the countryside between Lake Geneva and the Jura Mountains, thousands of physicists and engineers celebrated decades of hard work, incredible ingenuity and sheer ambition. Together they had created the largest-ever scientific experiment.

After the LHC was switched on, project leader Lyn Evans said, “We can now look forward to a new era of understanding about the origins and evolution of the universe.”

Operating a massive particle accelerator requires much more than flicking a switch – thousands of individual elements have to all come together, synchronised in time to less than a billionth of a second.

University College London’s physicist Jon Butterworth recalls a “particularly bizarre memory” from that day. Relaxing in a Westminster pub after an exhausting LHC event in London, Butterworth found he could follow live updates from his own ATLAS experiment on the pub’s TV.

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Wednesday, September 11th, 2013 Big Bang Machine, CERN, Large Hadron Collider, LHC, particle accelerator Comments Off on Large Hadron Coliider celebrates 5 years of not destroying the world!!

Large Hadron Collider D-meson study wraps up antimatter ‘flip’ story

Researchers at the Large Hadron Collider have witnessed particles called D-mesons flipping from matter into antimatter and back.

Antimatter is identical to matter, but with opposite electric charge.

Such “oscillations” are well known among three other particle types, but this is the first time D-mesons have been seen doing it in a single study.

The team behind the collider’s LHCb detector have put their results on the Arxiv repository.

The manuscript will be published in Physical Review Letters.

In the complicated zoo of subatomic physics, particles routinely decay into other particles, or spontaneously change from a matter type to their antimatter counterparts.

This “oscillation” forms an important part of the theory that attempts to tame the zoo – the Standard Model.

Mesons are part of a large family of particles made up of the fundamental particles known as quarks. This is a nice moment, it’s a sort of completeness Chris Parkes University of Manchester

The protons and neutrons at the centres of the atoms of matter we know well are each made up of three such quarks.

Mesons, on the other hand, are made of just two – specifically one quark and one antimatter quark.

Theory holds that four members of the meson family can undergo the matter-antimatter oscillation – the matter and antimatter quarks both flip to their opposites.

Three particle types – K-mesons and two types of B-mesons had been caught in the act before.

LHCb has already been intimately involved in refining those prior measurements; in March 2012, the team confirmed earlier oscillation observations of a meson called Bs, and published the result in Physics Letters B.

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Monday, March 4th, 2013 CERN, Large Hadron Collider, LHC Comments Off on Large Hadron Collider D-meson study wraps up antimatter ‘flip’ story

Scientist backing Higgs boson find

Scientist backing Higgs boson find

Professor Rolf Heuer, director general of Cern, believes it is ‘beyond any doubt’ that the ‘God particle’ has been discovered


Scientist backing Higgs boson find by PressAssociation

Friday, August 31st, 2012 CERN, Higgs Boson Comments Off on Scientist backing Higgs boson find

God Particle found at Large Hadron Collider

Scientists say they have found signs of the Higgs boson while conducting tests at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) on the French-Swiss border near Geneva.

Researchers at the LHC revealed the details at a packed press conference on Tuesday which was streamed live on the internet.

The search for the Higgs boson has been taking place near Geneva in a 27-kilometre circular tunnel 100 metres below the ground.

It is dubbed the “Big Bang machine” because scientists reckon it can recreate conditions a fraction of a second after the birth of the universe.

The machine has been built as a cost of £2.6 billion and weighs more than 38,000 tonnes.

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Tuesday, December 13th, 2011 God Particle, Large Hadron Collider Comments Off on God Particle found at Large Hadron Collider

Science world awaits Cern announcement on Higgs boson

Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider are expected to announce on Tuesday that they may have caught the first glimpse of the elusive God Particle.

God particle at CERN

Physicists working at the Cern laboratory in Geneva have summoned colleagues from around the world to a special seminar where they will announce their latest findings.

Although they will stop short of claiming a definitive scientific discovery, their data is understood to point towards the existence of the sought-after Higgs Boson – dubbed the “God particle.”

read the full article by Nick Collins of the daily telegrapgh

Tuesday, December 13th, 2011 CERN, Higgs Boson, Large Hadron Collider Comments Off on Science world awaits Cern announcement on Higgs boson

CERN launche new blog on Quantum Diaries platform

CERN is launching a new blog on the Quantum Diaries platform. Until now Quantum Diaries was focussed on providing a platform for individual particle physicists from around the world to post their thoughts on work and life. Today CERN and other particle physics laboratories have joined by launching official institutional blogs. Quantum Diaries is an initiative of the Interactions collaboration, a joint communication resource from the world’s physics laboratories.

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Monday, January 24th, 2011 CERN Comments Off on CERN launche new blog on Quantum Diaries platform

LHC experiments bring new insight into primordial universe

Geneva, 26 November 2010. After less than three weeks of heavy-ion running, the three experiments studying lead ion collisions at the LHC have already brought new insight into matter as it would have existed in the very first instants of the Universe’s life.

The ALICE experiment, which is optimised for the study of heavy ions, published two papers just a few days after the start of lead-ion running. Now, the first direct observation of a phenomenon known as jet quenching has been made by both the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. This result is reported in a paper from the ATLAS collaboration accepted for publication yesterday in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

A CMS paper will follow shortly, and results from all of the experiments will be presented at a seminar on Thursday 2 December at CERN. Data taking with ions continues to 6 December.

Read the full article from CERN here

Friday, November 26th, 2010 CERN, Large Hadron Collider, LHC Comments Off on LHC experiments bring new insight into primordial universe

Researchers at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are getting set to create the Big Bang on a miniature scale.

Researchers at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are getting set to create the Big Bang on a miniature scale.

Since 2009, the world’s highest-energy particle accelerator has been smashing together protons, in a bid to shed light on the fundamental nature of matter.

But now the huge machine will be colliding lead ions instead.

The experiments are planned for early November and will run for four weeks.

The LHC is housed in a 27km-long tunnel on the Franco-Swiss border and is managed by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (Cern).

The collider consists of four different experiments and one of them, ALICE, has been specifically designed to smash together lead ions.

The goal of these collisions is to investigate what the infant Universe looked like. Colliding protons at high energies was aimed at other aspects of physics, such as finding the elusive Higgs boson particle and signs of new physical laws, such as a framework called supersymmetry.

Cern’s spokesman James Gillies told BBC News that besides ALICE, the ATLAS and Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiments will also be temporarily colliding ions.

Big Bang

He said the tests could provide an insight into the conditions of the Universe some 13.7 billion years ago, just after the Big Bang.

They will look at the Universe fractions of a second after a tiny but very dense ball of energy exploded to create the cosmos as we know it today.

Continue reading the main story

“Start Quote

At the temperatures generated, even protons and neutrons will melt, resulting in a hot dense soup of quarks and gluons”

End Quote David Evans University of Birmingham, UK

Scientists believe that it was back then that a special state of matter existed, different from the matter the Universe is formed of now.

“Matter exists in various states: you can take a material like water and if you deep freeze it, it’ll be solid, and if you put it on a table, it’ll turn into a liquid, and if you put it into a kettle, it’ll turn into a gas,” said Dr Gillies.

“It’s all the same stuff, but those are different states of matter. And if you take materials into laboratories, you can pull the electrons off the atoms and you have another state of matter which is called plasma.”

But at the very beginning of the Universe, there might have been yet another state of matter. Physicists have dubbed this “stuff” the quark-gluon plasma.

“And this is the state of matter you have if you’re able to effectively melt the nuclear matter that makes up atoms today, releasing the things that are inside, which are quarks and gluons,” Dr Gillies explained.

read the full article here

Monday, November 8th, 2010 Big Bang Machine, CERN, Large Hadron Collider, LHC Comments Off on Researchers at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are getting set to create the Big Bang on a miniature scale.